CELEBRATING THE WIN: Mike Hensley and Tim Davis talk as the results began to come in showing Hensley was defeating   Jeannie Stotts and Bill Gray in the Democratic primary race for Jefferson County Superior Court judge. Hensley will face incumbent Alison Frazier in the November election. Frazier was unopposed in the primary. (Staff photo by Ken Ritchie/kritchie@madisoncourier.com)
CELEBRATING THE WIN: Mike Hensley and Tim Davis talk as the results began to come in showing Hensley was defeating Jeannie Stotts and Bill Gray in the Democratic primary race for Jefferson County Superior Court judge. Hensley will face incumbent Alison Frazier in the November election. Frazier was unopposed in the primary. (Staff photo by Ken Ritchie/kritchie@madisoncourier.com)
Madison attorney Mike Hensley won the Democratic primary for Superior Court judge on Tuesday.

Hensley received 1,615 votes (44 percent) of the vote. Finishing second was Mary Jean "Jeannie" Stotts with 1,175 votes (32 percent). William A. "Bill" Gray was third with 875 votes (24 percent).

Hensley will face incumbent Republican Alison Frazier in the November general election. Frazier was elected to the bench in 2008. This is her first campaign for re-election.

Hensley, 58, has practiced law in Madison for 34 years, and is a partner at Jenner, Pattison, Hensley & Wynn.

Hensley thanked the volunteers, family and friends who helped coordinate his campaign and spread his message.

"They're the ones that brought me the victory with their hard work," he said.

Gray said he was grateful for the clean campaign run by the Democrats and wished Hensley luck in the fall.

"Mike will make an excellent judge for Jefferson County," said Gray, who lives in Canaan and works as a public defender in Clark and Floyd counties.

Gray doesn't consider this his last attempt at the judgeship, and he recommended supporters with yard signs not throw them away.

"We're not going away," he said.

Stotts could not be reached for comment Tuesday night or this morning.

Prior to the fall election, Hensley said he will continue going door-to-door in the county to campaign.

"We're only halfway done," Hensley said.

The Jefferson County Superior Court handles criminal cases, domestic relations and civil claims. It is a high-volume court. In 2013, there were more than 3,700 cases that were filed in the court. Since 2008 - the last year there was an election for Superior Court judge - there have been more than 26,700 cases filed.

Due to ethics guidelines for judicial candidates, there are some topics they are not allowed to discuss while campaigning. According to the Indiana Code of Judicial Conduct, candidates running for a judge's seat cannot "make any statement that would reasonably be expected to affect the outcome or impair the fairness of a matter pending or impending in any court" or "make pledges, promises, or commitments that are inconsistent with the impartial performance of the adjudicative duties of judicial office."