Jacob Hall uses a technique called grave rubbing to more clearly see what is etched into the face of the gravestone. (Staff photo by Brett Eppley/beppley@madisoncourier.com)
Jacob Hall uses a technique called grave rubbing to more clearly see what is etched into the face of the gravestone. (Staff photo by Brett Eppley/beppley@madisoncourier.com)
Southwestern Middle School students brought their study of history into the present Wednesday as about 50 eighth-graders from Katie Moderau’s social studies classes continued work to map a cemetery at Smyrna Monroe Presbyterian Church on Deputy Pike.

Students began their work mapping on Monday, but had to work around the rain. Moderau’s classes are working alongside Historic Madison Inc. to document gravestones so that they can be added to online databases.

This data can then be used for genealogical research and further preservation of the 181-year-old church and the even older cemetery.

After gathering all of the information and making sure it’s accurate, students will present an interpretive program in the spring documenting their findings that will also include an element of live theater as students pose as some of the people they have researched.