LOOKING FOR A JOB: Pat King (above) came to Madison three years ago from South Bend Adams. He is 34-29 in three seasons at Madison — including a 14-6 record last year that was the Cubs’ first winning season since 2007 — and 281-277 overall. He is the second Madison basketball coach to resign in the last two months. (Courier file photo above by David Campbell, below by Mark Campbell)
LOOKING FOR A JOB: Pat King (above) came to Madison three years ago from South Bend Adams. He is 34-29 in three seasons at Madison — including a 14-6 record last year that was the Cubs’ first winning season since 2007 — and 281-277 overall. He is the second Madison basketball coach to resign in the last two months. (Courier file photo above by David Campbell, below by Mark Campbell)
Pat King has resigned as head boys basketball coach at Madison Consolidated High School after three years on the job.

King confirmed his resignation on Monday afternoon and told his team of his decision this morning.

"The job wasn't what I hoped it was going to be when I came here three years ago," King said by phone. "Scott (his son) is graduating and I can officially take retirement. So I guess in a way, I am officially retiring. But I already have applications out at other jobs and I'm hopeful to get another job in a couple of weeks."

King took over for Ryan Crick after a successful stint at South Bend Adams and the Cubs have improved in each of this three seasons. Madison went 34-29 in three years, including 14-6 this past season. He is 281-277 overall.

Madison was struggling when King arrived as the program's third coach in five years. The school fired Jim Matthews after a successful stint in 2009 and Crick was hired in late summer after the first choice for the job, Zach Henson, withdrew his name for consideration after it was learned that a restraining order had been issued against him by a female high school student.

The Cubs went 13-29 in Crick's two seasons and he was let go after the 2011 season.

Madison went 9-12 in King's first season and 11-11 last year before going 14-6 this past season. It was the program's first winning season since 2007.

"This decision has nothing to do with the basketball program. This decision is all about what happens between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m.," King said. "There have been changes at the school and a lot of things going on that it has become hard for me to do what needs to be done.

"Basketball-wise, I was pretty happy with the way the program has developed in the past three years," King added. "I think I'm leaving it in a better position than when I found it and that's all that a coach can ask for. And I think the next coach is going to feel they are in a good position because with 10 seniors, the program is in a good place."

King declined to go into specifics of what had changed at the school or why he was resigning, saying that he didn't want to "burn any bridges" on the way out. But he did make it clear that this was a recent development.

"This is June and we've been working with the team all May," King said. "That should tell you how quickly this came about."

King is the second Madison basketball coach to resign in the past two months. Girls varsity head coach Willie Humes quit after a successful three-year run that included two sectional titles and a final four appearance.

Humes cited difficulties he had with the administration as the reason for his resignation, among them possible relocation money and better facilities.

King said Monday that he could identify with Humes' position.

"I lot of (King's reasoning) is the same as Willie's," King said. "We've had seven coaches quit in the past year. We've had trouble getting coaches in other sports. That should tell you something right there."

King said he definitely plans to coach again and is looking "all around" for another job. He loves the Madison area and wanted to thank his fellow teachers at MCHS for their support.

"Scott is going to Purdue and I don't think I necessarily want to live on top of him and he probably doesn't want us there," King said. "But I'm looking for another job everywhere. This is the first time in my coaching career I've quit without having another job to go to. It's a different situation."